Change in French River


Randy Russon
By
February 24, 2017

First-year operator Jessy Landry is stepping down as president of the French River Rapids of the Northern Ontario Jr. Hockey League.

Landry, who purchased the Rapids from founding owner Allan Donnan during the last off-season, informed NOJHL officials and members of the French River organization of his decision via e-mail on Thursday.

While Landry has resigned as president of the two-year old franchise, he indicated that the Rapids — who will finish last overall in the 12-team NOJHL for the second straight season — will continue to operate, albeit with new management.

Below is the e-mail that Landry distributed on Thursday, a copy of which was forwarded to HockeyNewsNorth.com.

— — — — —

Good afternoon Rapid players and Rapid families,

Due to personal reasons, I will be stepping down effective immediately as President of the French River Rapids Hockey Club.

I sincerely thank all the players and families for your dedication to the team.

Please contact Paul Frustaglio or Heidi Paquette if you have any questions moving forward.

Hockey in French River is more alive than ever.

Go Rapids Go

Jessy Landry


What you think about “Change in French River”

  1. IN MY OPINION…Al Donan strikes again Held this guy to the fire took his money and ran…Al Time to get out of hockey Chum. Jesse I understand why you resigned good for you man, focus on family and working with other good people.

    Also rumors have the west Nippissing Lynx joining the NOJHL… RR any news on this?

  2. French River Rapids probably gonna fold over the summer and Nippissing Lynx taking their place. Would make sense to re-brand as the Sturgeon Falls Lynx.

  3. Someone must have googled Jessy Landry, too bad the governing bodies weren’t a little more pro-active before Mr Donan was permitted to compete the sale of the French River Rapids!

  4. The nojhl as per hockey Canada does an complete background check on everyone even to personal finances. I have been around hockey for 50+ years in the north and unless you have a population of 50,000 and you are the only game in town its hard to survive. I respect everyone and the hard work they put into these small communities giving young men a chance to live our their hockey dreams.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *